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Dzulkefly: Hello PM, where are the 1.8 million jobs? 61% unemployed were youth and those with tertiary education being the highest….Sigh.

March 28, 2017

Dzulkefly: Hello, where are the 1.8 million jobs?

| March 28, 2017

Amanah leader points to apparent conflict between Bank Negara’s report that youth unemployment rate reached 10.7% in 2015 and PM’s claim that 1.8 million jobs were created between 2010 and 2016.

Dzulkefly-Ahmad-jobKUALA LUMPUR: Bank Negara Malaysia’s report on unemployment and the prime minister’s assertion on the creation of jobs are in conflict, Amanah strategy director Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad said today.

Prime Minister Najib Razak said on March 22 that the National Transformation Programme (NTP) had created 1.8 million jobs between 2010 and 2016.

In his keynote address at the 2017 Global Transformation Forum here, Najib also said, through the NTP, no Malaysian would get left behind and that the needs of all people were being met.

In its Annual Report 2016, Bank Negara revealed that the youth unemployment rate in Malaysia reached 10.7% in 2015, more than three times higher than the country’s unemployment rate of 3.1%.

The central bank noted that 61% of the total unemployed workers were youths, despite only making up a third of the labour force. It said youths with tertiary education were the highest among the unemployed – at 15.3%.

The data revealed that the high unemployment rate was recorded among the population aged 20-24 years, that is 42% in 2015, followed by those aged 25-29 years (20.4%) and those aged 15-19 years (19%).

In 2015, Bank Negara said, the youth unemployment rate increased by 1.2 percentage points from an estimated 9.5% to 10.7%, while the national unemployment rate increased by only 0.2 percentage points (2.9% to 3.1%) during the same period.

Mocking the prime minister, Dr Dzulkefly said: “He seems oblivious of the actual perennial problem of youth unemployment.

“So what is happening Mr Prime Minister.”

He said Najib’s announcement that ‘no Malaysian gets left behind’ rang hollow in the wake of the Bank Negara report.

“This is indeed alarming and unsettling, to say the least. Its direct impact on the rise of social problems, namely (youth) involvement in drugs and criminal activities, would be the visible consequences.

“The overall well-being of society needs to be secured through increasing social and welfare programmes to assist this critical group,” the Amanah leader said.

He said there were many reasons for youth unemployment, including an uneven growth between job creation and job-seekers and a mismatch in skillsets between employment demand and supply.

But, he charged, not much had been done to address these problems.

Saying youth unemployment and underemployment were still pernicious, Dzulkefly added: “Sorry PM, you failed!”

 

 

PM, your 1.8 million jobs (created) rang hollow.
1. When the PM Najib Razak proudly announced that 1.8 millions jobs (22 March, Bernama) were created from 2010 to 2016 under the National Transformation Programme, he seems oblivious of the actual perennial problem of youth unemployment.
2. Najib categorical announcement that ‘no Malaysian gets left behind’ rings hollow when last week Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) Annual Report of 2016 revealed that youth unemployment reached 10.7% in 2015, more than three times (3x) higher than the country’s unemployment rate of 3.1% (which arguably is a relatively good number).
3. Youth unemployment rate has outpaced the rest of the population by about 6 times higher (1.2 percentage point as compared to 0.2 percentage points). The data revealed that unemployment rate was recorded at 42% among 20-24 years in 2015 followed by aged group between 25-29 years at 20.4% and 15-19 years at 19%. It also specifically pointed out that unemployment is especially pronounced amongst graduates. The unemployment rate with tertiary education is at 15.3%.
4. So what is happening Mr Prime Minister. Stop, pulling wools over the rakyat eyes, with all your ‘magical numbers’ as you’re quite evidently ill-informed.
5. According to the report, youth represent more than half (61%) of the total unemployed workers, while only making a third of the labour force currently.
6. This is indeed alarming and unsettling to say of the least. Its direct impact on rise of social problems, namely involvement in drug and criminal activities would be the visible consequences. The overall well-being of society would have have to be secured through increasing social and welfare programmes as to assist this critical group.
7. As is always explained, youth unemployment is a multi-factorial problem. Rationale of a uneven growth between job creation and job-seekers, a mismatch of sort in skillsets between demand and supply-side has been unending  but not much has been addressed appaently.
8. Besides, policy framework must go beyond skills and training development but also to put in place effective functioning feedback mechanism between the industry and educational institutions.
9. Suggestion for an intensive tri-partite involvement of policymakers, educationists and private sectors employers be instituted has time and again be repeated,  but youth unemployment and underemployment is a still pernicious and a perennial problem. Sorry PM, you failed!
Dr Dzullefly Ahmad
Strategy Director
Parti Amanah Negara
28 March 2017.
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