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‘Mursi Meter’ to monitor Egypt president’s electoral promises.

June 28, 2012

(Good for a start. How I’d would have wished that we had it here, Simple yet effective to put everyone in check..both Federal govt and State government).

Al Arabiya,
27 June 2012

CAIRO, Jun 27: A group of Egyptian youth launched a website called ‘Mursi Meter’ to monitor the performance of Egypt’s new president to ensure he does not renege on promises made during his election campaign.

“This is an attempt to document and monitor the performance of Egypt’s president-elect Mohammed Mursi against the pledges he made in his election program for the first 100 days,” says the website’s introduction.

The website lists the five points around which Mursi’s 100-day program focused: bread, traffic, security, fuel, and cleanliness. Under each of those problems, the solutions proposed by Mursi are listed so that each of them can be checked when and if it is implemented on the ground.

For example, under traffic he suggested using empty land space as parking lots and setting specific hours for trucks to drive through the city and under security he suggested giving bonuses to policemen who prove efficient in protecting citizens and maintaining law and order and launching an expansive media campaign that aims at retrieving the lost trust between the police and the people.

As for fuel, Mursi vowed to penalize all those involved in smuggling fuel and thus causing shortage as well as rewarding gas stations with the best record in serving customers.

The website claims that Mursi made 64 promises during his election campaign. The meter will document which ones he delivers on in the 100-day period. This allows users to see the accomplishments in comparison to the time in which they were made.

The website is the first of its kind in Egypt and is seen by observers as an indication of the drastic change that took place in the country after the January 25 Revolution that allowed citizens to openly criticize and evaluate the most senior of the country’s officials.

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